“Boyisms”

I know that “Boyism” is not a word, but I think it is a great way to describe some of the things that my son says that are unique to him.  I always say that I am going to “write that one down” and I often forget.  Thankfully, some of my favorites are captured by this blog.

I typically am blessed with “boyisms” during the quiet times.  Minutes before falling asleep, walking home from school, or eating a snack are some of the times where my son shares his thoughts without fear of judgment.

Last night’s conversation went like this…

“Mama…What was my first word that I ever said?”

“You said the word ‘Mama’ and it was one of the sweetest things that I had ever heard.”

“That means that you will be the most significant to me until the last breath that I take.”

I stopped for a moment and then said, “My son…What makes you say that?”

“I just know it to be true.”

I don’t know where this came from.  I don’t know why he felt that his first word would somehow have a connection to his last.  I continued to push for insight and he became annoyed.  He seemed dissapointed…as though he thought that I would have understood what he said to be true without question.

Some “boyisms” are deep and reflective and I am left with wonder.  Others, are comments that I could have lived a lifetime without hearing; however, he feels compelled to share these “Sienfeld-type” observations…

“Do you know that when I look at you from behind, that you look a bit like a Sumo wrestler?”

“What are you cooking that makes that terrible poo smell?”

“Have you ever thought how that sandwich looks like flesh?”

“As much as I love having you next to me…can you turn your head because your breath is horrible!”

As parents, we take their criticism and then move on.  We can’t stay with the insult because these words aren’t shared to hurt us (even though they might). Instead, it is our child speaking his truth.  Whether it is good or bad, my precious son hasn’t developed the filter that most adults have learned to use on a daily basis.  Having spoken to other parents of twice-exceptional children, this filter seems to come at a later date than a “typical” child.

No one seems to be off-limits when it comes to my son sharing his insights.  Teachers, relatives, friends and strangers have all been lucky “receivers” of “boyisms.”

“Does she think that crying baby is cute?”

” You don’t expect me to really use that filthy bathroom, do you?”

“I would prefer that you not use that perfume around me.”

Now, my son often starts his observations with…”I don’t mean to be rude but…”  I suppose that I should appreciate his attempts to soften the blow a bit and thankfully most that know him understand it.  We find that his more sophisticated sensory awareness is at the root of many of his frank messages.

Throughout the day, I hear constant chatter.  On the busiest days, I have to remind myself to slow down and pay attention to the times where the noise stops.  When you take the time to do that, what do you hear your children sharing?  What are the “-isms” from your house?

Advertisements

9 thoughts on ““Boyisms”

  1. I love that kids always speak the truth. We need to appreciate that it is the only time in our life where we don’t try to hide how we feel about something. Sometimes I wish adults could continue this – then at least we all would know where we stand with each other.

    • Anne-
      I agree! While I appreciate manners, I think we expect our kids to all say, act, and think the same way. Mine is learning to think about his words so that he isn’t sent to the office for rudeness or hurting the feelings of the elders of the family 🙂

  2. Oh boy! (Pun intended) LOL! THe things that they say!

    I participate in a monthly thing where bloggers share little snippets of their lives called “Fly on the Wall”. I save up everything my kids say and share them each month for this. It makes a pretty amusing post. We are pretty amusing people sometimes.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s